Melissa's Mela

Welcome to my mela, my gathering. A mellifluous flow...

permalink schomburgcenter:

Talks at the Schomburg: Ntozake Shange
Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 6:30 - 8:00pm 
In conjunction with the exhibition i found god in myself, Shange celebrates the 40th anniversary of her landmark work, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, with a discussion about its creation and influence.
When Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf: a choreopoem appeared on the theater scene in New York City in 1975, it achieved immense popularity. Ten years later, it was still being produced in various theaters throughout the United States. With this “choreo poem”—a performance piece made up of a combination of poems and dance—Shange introduced various themes and concerns that continue to characterize her writings and performances. Her works are often angry diatribes against social forces that contribute to the oppression of black women in the United States combined with a celebration of women’s self-fulfillment and spiritual survival.
For more information click here.
Watch Live!

schomburgcenter:

Talks at the Schomburg: Ntozake Shange

Wednesday, October 15, 2014, 6:30 - 8:00pm

In conjunction with the exhibition i found god in myself, Shange celebrates the 40th anniversary of her landmark work, for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf, with a discussion about its creation and influence.


When Ntozake Shange’s for colored girls who have considered suicide/when the rainbow is enuf: a choreopoem appeared on the theater scene in New York City in 1975, it achieved immense popularity. Ten years later, it was still being produced in various theaters throughout the United States. With this “choreo poem”—a performance piece made up of a combination of poems and dance—Shange introduced various themes and concerns that continue to characterize her writings and performances. Her works are often angry diatribes against social forces that contribute to the oppression of black women in the United States combined with a celebration of women’s self-fulfillment and spiritual survival.

For more information click here.

Watch Live!

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"Baby. baby look to the sky, seeking to find The Third Eye…" ~Roy Ayers

(Source: Spotify)

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i believe in living…i believe in life…i believe in the sweat of love and in the fire of truth.
— ~Assata Shakur (via imaniuzuri / @gypsygirlbliss)
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Look closely at the present you are constructing: it should look like the future you are dreaming.
— Alice Walker
permalink #Makandal: The Goal.

#Makandal: The Goal.

permalink lovely. honey.  #mellifluous

lovely. honey.  #mellifluous

(Source: theshinysquirrel, via thatkindofwoman)

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push up the fader. bust the meter. shake the tweeter. #bumpIt

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permalink La Sirene adorned.

La Sirene adorned.

(Source: curethriftshop)

permalink Alma Thomas’ Late Night Reflections is on view now in Blues for Smoke.
whitneymuseum:

In 1972, Alma Thomas became the first African-American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney. Her Late Night Reflections is on view now in Blues for Smoke.
Alma Thomas (1891–1978), Late Night Reflections, 1972. Acrylic on canvas, 28 ¾ x 44 inches. Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Purchase, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Fund for Acquisitions and bequest of Marjorie Pfeffer by exchange. Photograph by Peter Paul Geoffrion

Alma Thomas’ Late Night Reflections is on view now in Blues for Smoke.

whitneymuseum:

In 1972, Alma Thomas became the first African-American woman to have a solo exhibition at the Whitney. Her Late Night Reflections is on view now in Blues for Smoke.

Alma Thomas (1891–1978), Late Night Reflections, 1972. Acrylic on canvas, 28 ¾ x 44 inches. Collection of the Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA. Purchase, Nasher Museum of Art at Duke University Fund for Acquisitions and bequest of Marjorie Pfeffer by exchange. Photograph by Peter Paul Geoffrion

(via blackcontemporaryart)